Saturday, July 15, 2017

Mont-d'Or AOP – One France’s Best Mild Cheeses.

from
Behind the French Menu
by
Bryan G. Newman
   
Mont d’Or cheese.

The Mont-d'Or AOP  cheese, (also called the Vacherin du Haut-Doubs) is a soft, creamy, 45% fat, mild, great tasting, non-pasteurized, cow’s milk cheese that is produced with unpasteurized milk in the winter( from 15 August through 31 March).
  
The cheese’s pate is a light yellow with the rind an ivory to light brown.  It is aged for a minimum of three weeks, and when fully ripe the cheese has a white mold on top and is just beginning to be runny. The cheese is sold in a 500 – 600-gram (18 – 21 grams) a spruce pine-wood box in which it is aged and which contributes to the cheese's smell and flavor; larger cheeses are made for restaurants.
   
The cheese plate is ready.

    
The cheese may be on the cheese trolley or a cheese plate or eaten with a spoon as the main course with potatoes and vegetables or as a dessert, often when lightly heated.
  
For the winter the cows will have been brought down from their mountain pastures to warm barns still over 700 meters high in the French Alps.  In the winter the cows produce less milk but their cream has a concentrated, intensified flavor and that makes this an exceptional cheese. The cheese was developed hundreds of years ago, probably in the 13th century, by monks. Mont d’Or will be on menus and in cheese shops from September to April.
    

The Mont d’Or cheese production team.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/doganowscy/762800824/
      
Mont-d'Or AOC on French menus:
    

A lightly cooked Mont d’Or
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lejoe/3066034281/
   
Escargots Mont d’Or Beurre Maison – Snails Prepared with Mont d’Or Cheese and the house’s special butter sauce recipe
  
Mont d'Or et Saucisse de Morteau -  Mont d’Or cheese served with the Morteau AOP sausage. The Saucisse de Morteau is a pork salami type sausage that may be eaten without any additional cooking. For this dish, the sausage will have been cooked again.
  
Mont d'Or, Salade, Pomme de Terre Grenaille, Cornichons et Charcuterie - Mont d’Or cheese, salad, small pebble size new potatoes, cornichons along with cold meats and slices of sausages.
  
Your French-English travel dictionary and Google Translate may translate grenaille as a shot (the type fired from a shotgun); nonetheless, Pomme de Terre Grenaille potatoes are not that tiny.  Pomme de Terre Grenaille are very small new potatoes, more like pebbles, and in the season they should not be missed.
 
 Raviole de Mont d'Or, Vinaigrette à la Brisure de Truffe et son Mesclun de Jeunes -  Ravioli stuffed with Mont d’Or cheese and served with a mesclun salad made with salad green shoots accompanied by a vinaigrette dressing flavored with flakes of truffle.
     

A perfectly ripe Mont d’Or
  
The Haut-Doubs
   
Mont d'Or comes from the area of the Haut-Doubs in the department of Doubs in the region of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté. (The region of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté was created on the 1-1-2016 by joining together the departments of Burgundy and Franche-Comté  in one super region). One of the Jura Mountains, which separate France and Switzerland is called the Mont d'Or hence the name.
  
A similar cheese from Switzerland.
  
On the Swiss side of the Alps, in Switzerland, they make a somewhat similar cheese. It is made with thermized milk and called the Vacherin Mont d'Or.  Thermized (or thermalized) milk is made by heating milk at a low temperature for a short period. Nevertheless, for import to the United States thermized milk is treated like unpasteurized milk and the cheese must have been aged for over 60 days. The arguments about whether the first Mont d’Or cheese was created on the Swiss or French side of the Alps will go on forever.  For more about buying cheese in France and taking it home click here.

Other famous cheeses from the Franche-Comté include:

 
 
   

A Mont d’Or farmhouse in the winter.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ludo29/5315366395/

Connected Posts:
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
   
Behind the French Menu’s links include hundreds of words, names, and phrases that are seen on French menus. There are nearly 400 articles that include over 2,000 French dishes with English translations and explanations. Add the word, words or phrase that you are searching for to the words "Behind the French Menu" and search with Google or Bing.
 
Bryan G. Newman

Behind the French Menu
Copyright 2010, 2017.

For information on the unpublished book behind this blog contact Bryan Newman
at

behindthefrenchmenu@gmail.com

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Steak de Hampe - A Flavorful French Cut of Beef With no Corresponding USA or UK Cut to Compare With.

from
Behind the French Menu
by
Bryan G. Newman
  

Steak de Hampe.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/64141731@N00/6834216274/  

Many French cuts of meat may have no exact US or UK equivalents, and  Steak de Hampe, is one of those.  French chefs will tell you that the hampe is a flavorful steak with a little more fat than a flank steak, the French onglet. Butchers consider it part of the US tri-tip and in the UK part of the flank.   Steak or Bifteck de Hampe is a favorite cut for France’s great Steak Frites.

Steak de Hampe on French menus:

 Steak de Hampe de Boeuf et Gratin Dauphinois – A  hampe steak served with Gratin DauphinoisGratin Dauphinois is baked sliced potatoes cooked in milk and cream, flavored with nutmeg, garlic, thyme, and shallots and then browned under the grill usually with Gruyere or Parmesan cheese.
  

Gratin Dauphinoise
https://www.flickr.com/photos/karenandbrademerson/3118473571/
 
Steak de Hampe Sauce au Poivre – A hampe steak prepared with a pepper sauce. Nearly all pepper steaks are made with green peppercorns.  Green peppercorns are usually the pepper of choice for a steak au poivre, a pepper steak. Black pepper can override the flavor of the steak.
   

Steak au Poivre.
 
Hampe de Boeuf Grillée,  Frites –  A grilled hampe steak served with French fries, UK chips; this a classic Steak Frit  

Steak Frites
https://www.flickr.com/photos/aedenhensley/5716157098/

La Hampe de Bœuf Grillée, Sauce Bordelaise, Poêlée De Pommes De Terre Et Champignons – A grilled hampe steak served with a Sauce Bordelaise accompanied by potatoes fried with button mushrooms.  Sauce Bordelaise is made with a veal stock, a Bordeaux red wine, butter, shallots, and herbs.
 
Hampe de Veau Grillée, Sauce aux Deux Moutardes au Thym – A grilled hampe veal steak prepared with a sauce made from two different mustards and thyme.  
 
Hampe steaks will have been marinated in red wine for 24 hours before being lightly fried or grilled. This cut is never prepared well done; it will be tough and shriveled.  If you only eat well-done steaks order an entrecote.

To order a steak in France cooked the way you like it click here.

Connected posts:
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


Behind the French Menu’s links include hundreds of words, names, and phrases that are seen on French menus. There are nearly 400 articles that include over 2,000 French dishes with English translations and explanations. To search for more articles like this one simply add the word, words or phrase you are searching for to the words "Behind the French Menu" and search with Google or Bing.
  
Bryan G. Newman

Behind the French Menu
Copyright 2010, 2017.

For information on the unpublished book behind this blog contact Bryan Newman
at
behindthefrenchmenu@gmail.com


Saturday, July 1, 2017

Black-Bass, Black-bass à Grande Bouche – Largemouth Bass or Largemouth Black Bass. Largemouth Black Bass on French Menus.

from
Behind the French menu
by
Bryan G. Newman
     
Largemouth black bass.

Largemouth black bass is a North American freshwater fish introduced into European rivers for sports fishermen and women in the late 19th century.  These American imports have established themselves in many streams and rivers in Europe. A French chef who is an active amateur fisherman, on the river where his restaurant is, told me eating largemouth black bass may be considered revenge as they eat young crayfish. Young crayfish, when left alone grow into bigger crayfish, and they have many of their own admirers in the French culinary world. Nevertheless, he considers black bass as a tasty fish, and when offered fish caught by local fishermen and women, he will place them on his menu; any fish, not just bass, that he catches himself are for his friends and family.
   
Catching black bass.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/92414546@N04/14261780228/
   
Largemouth Black Bass on French menus:
  
Black-Bass à Grande Bouche Poêlé à l'Anis – Largemouth bass fried with aniseed. (See the appendix Herbs and Spices, Mushrooms and Truffles: Anis).
  
 Lightly fried black bass in a fennel-accented sauce.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuart_spivack/3240438372/
  
Black-Bass à Grande Bouche Vapeur, Poireaux, Champignons de Paris et une Crème Légère au Citron - Steamed largemouth bass prepared with leeks and button mushrooms and served with a light and creamy lemon accented sauce.
  
Black-Bass à Grande Bouche Fumée et sa Marinade Citron –Largemouth bass smoked and served in a lemon marinade.
  
Carpaccio de Black Bass – A Carpaccio of largemouth bass.
  
Black-Bass à la Fondue d'Échalotes – Black bass served on a bed of shallots.
  
A river in Maine.
Maine has over 1,000 lakes and an untold number of rivers and streams.
   
French and visiting freshwater sportsmen and women along with commercial fishermen and women catch these fish using a rod and line; they may reach 2 kilos or more.  The professionals mostly sell their catches directly to restaurants and in farmer’s markets near to where the fish are caught. Unfortunately, the catches are rarely large enough or valuable enough to reach the big cities. Nevertheless,  if you are traveling in France, they will be on many riverside and lakeside menus. The larger fish will usually be served as grilled filets or fried filets, and they are a tasty fish.
  
My family and I caught the North American family members of these fish. We were on vacation in the lakes and rivers in Northern Maine, and it was, unfortunately, not the salmon season. One of our sons caught a young salmon but it was below the legal catch size, and it was returned to the lake. We stayed at a fishing lodge and took a fishing guide, who promised us good fishing and good eating with large mouthed bass. 
   
Largemouth black bass.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/6102597325/
   
Largemouth black bass is a tasty fish.  The fish we caught were at most 400 grams (14 ounces, just under 1 lb) each. The guide knew all the best places for largemouth black bass, and we just reeled them in. When we had caught enough for lunch, we sat on the bank of the lake, fried them in olive oil and a few herbs. Together with the additions provided by the fishing lodge where we stayed along with a cold bottle of white wine. the fish made a magnificent lunch.  The next day we repeated our success on the St John River; the St John River is part of the USA State of Maine's border with Canada.  Some of the fish we caught that day may have been Canadian, but they tasted the same as the American fish! Maine has over 1,000 lakes and an untold number of rivers and streams. In two days we only saw two other people.
   
Largemouth Black Bass in the languages of France's neighbors:
   
(Catalan - perca americana), (Dutch -forelbaars, zwarte baars), (German - Amerikanischer schwarzbarsch, forellenbarsch), (Italian -persico trota), (Spanish - perca Americana,),
   
Connected posts:
     
 
  
 
  
  

Behind the French Menu’s links include hundreds of words, names, and phrases that are seen on French menus. There are nearly 400 articles that include over 2,000 French dishes with English translations and explanations. To search for more articles like this one simply add the word, words or phrase you are searching for to the words "Behind the French Menu" and search with Google or Bing.

Bryan G.Newman

Behind the French Menu

Copyright 2010, 2017.
    
For information on the unpublished book behind this blog contact Bryan Newman
at
behindthefrenchmenu@gmail.com